Sword of Fargoal 2 Interview

The editors over at Gamezebo have cranked out an interview with Sword of Fargoal designer Jeff McCord about his goals and ambitions for the roguelike sequel and the nail-biter Kickstarter campaign that he hopes will make the game a reality. A sampling:
“I think a lot of the games of old are living a scene, or living one scenario. Whereas, with a roguelike, you’re really playing out an entire quest, and sometimes, an entire life,” muses McCord. “In addition, that life is played out in a myriad of different ways depending on how you live it.” In their infiniteness, then, roguelikes seem to come closer to gaming’s true promise than perhaps any of today’s hyper-realistic shooters or action adventures. They act as turnkey solutions for escapism, into which we can constantly pour our lives, always getting others in return. McCord is particularly excited about the way the game’s new playable classes will add to this experience. Though, to hear him tell it, he wasn’t always excited about new things.

“There was a point where I was talking to Paul, and insisting that we keep the animated cutscenes from the original Fargoal,” remembers McCord of early development. “[But] he said, ‘No, those will always exist, and we will always have that and continue to support that, and people love it. But Fargoal 2 is going to have its own amazing, exciting things. We have to make it new.'” Ultimately, it’s that lofty goal - making something old, new again - that is at the heart of this Kickstarter; at the heart, as well, of why it’s needed. Putting it mildly, McCord lays his heart on his sleeve: “We are definitely still committed to doing Sword of Fargoal 2, but it is definitely going to take us a lot longer without Kickstarter. We can only do just Sword of Fargoal for so much time before we can’t afford to anymore.”

He’s laying it all on the line, it seems, so I figure I might as well ask: is it Kickstarter or bust for this team? Are you scared you won’t make it? Here, McCord pauses for a minute, his eyes darting to his phone - no doubt checking an e-mail about the campaign or the game.

“I’m fighting for the Kickstarter campaign literally day and night, until the wee hours of the morning,” he says. Then, his voice shifting momentarily from his usual cheer, he adds: “I can say that I’m scared shitless.” I search for an encouraging response, but before it can pass my lips, he’s back again. “But, [I’m] also being extremely hopeful at the same time. It’s actually not unlike the quest to get the sword. I’m traveling down to the 20th level, and I’m in reach of the sword.”